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(1572 - 1637) Jonson was described by the Scottish poet Drummond of Hawthornden as "a great lover and praiser of himself, a contemner and scorner of others". This attitude is evident in his most famous satirical works: Volpone and The Alchemist. WSP performed Ben Jonson’s, Bartholomew Fair, during our spring 2011 season.

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(1564 - 1593) Marlowe is most well known for the tragedy Tamburlaine. His other notable works include Edward II (performed by our players in 2006) and Doctor Faustus. Marlowe was cut down in his prime, allegedly murdered over a bar tab, at the age of 29. While some mystery remains over the true motives behind his death, he is quite clearly the victim in our Rumble.

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(1580 - 1627) Middleton has been credited with several collaborations and revisions of Shakespeare's work, including a revision of Macbeth. His most famous play The Changeling (performed by this troupe in 2010) was a tragedy coauthored with William Rowley. WSP performed the author's comedy A Mad World, My Master in the spring of 2008.

A Short History

Willing Suspension Productions was originally formed in 1992 by a group of graduate students in Boston University’s English Department. Our mission is to produce outstanding but little known non-Shakespearean plays from the 15th and 16th century English theater, drawing its cast and crew from both the graduate and undergraduate student bodies. In 2005, after a hiatus due to the graduation of its central members, the company was restarted by graduate students Kristin Bezio, Liam Meyer, and Matt Stokes. Through the generous support of Boston University and the BU English Department, WSP has been able to offer a unique opportunity to see a rarely staged masterpiece of the Renaissance stage every Spring for the last nine years.

We would like to thank the Boston
University Humanities Foundation

and the National Endowment for the
Humanities
for their material support
of the company, and the faculty of the
BU English Department for creating an
academic environment that encourages
the exploration of literature in new and
unconventional ways.